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Lean Domain Search Partners with Sedo to Help You Find the Perfect Domain Name

I’m thrilled to announce that Lean Domain Search has teamed up with Sedo to make it even easier for you to find a great domain name for your next website.

In the past when you performed a search on Lean Domain Search it paired your term with 5,000 other keywords commonly found in domain names and instantly showed you which were available to register. If a domain name was registered though, regardless of whether it was for sale or not, it would not be shown to you.

By partnering with Sedo, the world’s largest domain name marketplace, Lean Domain Search can now automatically check to see whether a registered domain name is for sale or not. If it is for sale, its details are included in the search results so you can consider that domain name when deciding on one for your website.

Here, for example, are the search results for ‘task’. Notice the premium domain names are in orange at the top followed by the available domain names in green below it (click to enlarge):

Of the 5,000 .COM domain names that Lean Domain Search checked for this search, 3,294 were available and of the remaining 1,706 registered domain names, 213 of them were for sale on Sedo.

Here’s a close up of the premium results:

Most, but not all of the premium domain names have prices associated with them. The ones that do have a price include in next to the name so you can instantly tell whether it’s in your price range.

Lean Domain Search only shows the first section of premium domain names by default but if you’d like to view all of the results you can simply click the “show more premium domains” link below the first section of premium domain names:

The premium results, like the available results, are ordered by default by the popularity of the keyword your term is paired with so that the ones most likely to form good domain names appear at the top of the list. You can also use the built in sorting features to sort by price so that you can see which are the most and least expensive.

Here are the same results sorted by price:

With the exception of a few outliers, most are in the several hundred to several thousand dollar price range.

You can check out the results for ‘task’ or start your own search.

If you’re looking for a good keyword-based .COM domain name for your website, the new Lean Domain Search should by far be the fastest way to find a name for it regardless of your budget.

I want to thank Sedo’s technical team for providing support during the integration as well as Chris Joseph with Namecore, a provider of handpicked domain names for startups, for providing his portfolio during the pilot program that’s been running the last few weeks.

As always, if you have any questions or feedback please don’t hesitate to drop me a note: matt@leandomainsearch.com or @mhmazur on Twitter.

Thanks!

Available “Black Friday” Domain Names

There was a really interesting post published over at SEOMoz this week title How I Made $13,490.50 With Adsense Last November where the author, Scott Offord, explains how he crafted a site, ThanksgivingBlackFridayAds.com, to bring in thousands of dollars in AdSense and affiliate revenue each holiday season.

Scott explains:

Recognizing a profitable opportunity, I created a website that gives people what they want: early intel about Black Friday discounts and hot items.

The domain name — ThanksgivingBlackFridayAds — was clearly chosen to rank well for Thanksgiving/Black Friday search terms. That got me thinking (and probably many other folks too) whether there are other good Black Friday domains still out there.

A quick search reveals that there are still a lot of great available domains containing “Black Friday”:

While not all would make good website names, there are more than a few gems including:

DigitalBlackFriday.com
BlackFridayDirect.com
BlackFridayLink.com
BlackFridayExpress.com
BlackFridayPoint.com
BlackFridayStar.com

Buyer beware though: Scott notes that ranking for Black Friday can be difficult, even with a great exact match domain name:

It doesn’t help either that Yahoo/Bing decided to globally deindex almost any site that had the words “Black Friday” in its domain name too.

New Registrar: NameTerrific

A few days ago the founder of a new domain name registrar called NameTerrific emailed me to inquire about adding it to Lean Domain Search’s supported affiliates list. I checked it out and was immediately impressed.

It’s tag line is “Domain names for geeks” and it was built from the ground up with an emphasis on simplicity and ease of access. NameTerrific offers a full API for managing your domains, supports OAuth for login, and is powered by Route 53, a DNS service provided by Amazon. Ryan, its founder, also did a length Q&A on HackerNews where he goes into a lot more detail about the service.

Check out NameTerrific.com to read more or you can switch your preferred registrar through Lean Domain Search to make NameTerrific your default registrar from now on.

Lean Domain Search Upgrade Price Reduced to $24

I’m happy to announce that it now only costs $24 to upgrade to a premium Lean Domain Search account so that you can view the full set of available search results.

Previously there were two plans: $79 once and $199 per year. A number of people contacted me and said “Hey, I’d love to sign up, but the $79 is still a bit high. Can you do any better?”

The new pricing scheme eliminates the $79 once plan and replaces it with a $24 per month plan. For many of who have been eager to upgrade but hesitant to pay $79, this will save you a bit of money as long as you cancel your subscription within the first three months. If you’d like to use Lean Domain Search longer than that you can maintain your subscription for as long as you’d like. If you know up front that you’re going to use Lean Domain Search for a while you can sign up for the $199 per year plan and save yourself about 30% over the course of a year.

To upgrade, check out our Plans and Pricing page.

As always, don’t hesitate to drop me a note if you have any questions.

Matt Mazur
matt@leandomainsearch.com | @mhmazur

Improving the Search Result Formatting

A small but kind of cool update today:

In the past when you performed a search Lean Domain Search would convert your search term to lowercase before combining it with the prefix or suffixes so that the results looked something like this:

With today’s update, all of the results retain the proper casing:

This not only makes it easier to browse the results but it also helps you visualize how the domain name would look if were to use it throughout your marketing efforts.

Pricing Updates

Last Monday I released Lean Domain Search’s new business name generator, a tool aimed at helping prospective business owners come up with a professional name for their business.

Just about everyone who tried it agreed that it came up with fantastic results; Domain Name Wire even wrote an excellent post titled Lean Domain Search adds business name generator the day after the launch.

However the more people I spoke to the more I realized that it wasn’t clear to folks what that difference was between the old website name generator and the new the business name generator. The business name generator helps you come up with website names too, right? Yes, I explained, but the domain names the business name generator comes up with are more geared towards offline businesses. I gave an example or two, they would ask some follow up questions, I’d answer, and after a few minutes of back and forth most folks kind of had a better idea what the difference was. If it took someone I was speaking with several minutes to understand the subtle distinction between the two tools, the casual web visitor was probably not going to get it at all (and this is not their fault or a matter of me writing better copy… it really is confusing).

The second problem was that it would be very difficult to reach the right people at the right time who could really benefit from the business name generator. The scenario I laid out in the launch blog post was that you wanted to start a construction company and were having trouble finding a name. That is a good example as far as my ideal customer goes, but reaching someone trying to start a construction company at that crucial stage where they still needed a business name was going to be extremely difficult. With some heavy marketing I might be able to reach some of them at just the right time, but even if I did I’d have to get them to understand the previously mentioned difference between the website name generator and the business name generator.

All of this is a long way of saying that I decided scrap the business name generator so that like before, there’s just one section for searching for domain names. However instead of completely getting rid of those results, I merged the domain names the business name generator created with the old website name generator so that the site now checks a whopping 6,188 domain names instead of 2,500, giving you an even wider selection of domain names to choose from.

A new pricing model

In order to continue devoting time to Lean Domain Search, I do need to find an income stream on top of affiliate revenue to support the site. So what I’ve done is this:

Lean Domain Search is still free to use, but the number of available search results that you can review for free will be limited to a few hundred. These are the best search results and should give most of you an adequate selection of good domain names to choose from. If you’d like to explore all of the search results (up to 6,188 max) for an even wider selection of domain name ideas, then you have to upgrade to one of the paid plans.

Similar to the pricing model for the business name generator there are two paid plans: one if you want short term access to the full search results (typical if you use Lean Domain Search infrequently and just use every now and then to name a website) and one for long term access (typical if you use it year round to name a lot of websites or businesses). If you’re interested in signing up for one of these premium plans, I encourage you to check out our new Pricing and Sign Up page. I hope you’ll agree that for the time and money that you save by using Lean Domain Search, the new pricing is a pretty good deal.

As always if you have any feedback on the changes please don’t hesitate to drop me an email (matt@leandomainsearch.com) or say hi on Twitter @mhmazur.

Thanks —
Matt

How to Extract Domain Names from VeriSign’s .COM Zone File

For those of you not familiar with it, the zone file is a file generated daily that lists all of the active domain names and corresponding name servers for a particular Top Level Domain (TLD) like .COM, .NET, etc.

VeriSign managers the .COM zone file and in the last post I explained how to obtain access to download VeriSign’s .COM zone file. In this tutorial I’ll explain how to parse the zone file to extract just the domain names and strip out everything else.

Working with the zone file

The size of the uncompressed zone file varies by day but you can figure it will be somewhere around 8.5 GB:

Any attempt you make to open the entire zone file in a text editor will likely crash your computer, so you have to resort to working with it via the command line (the rest of this tutorial assumes you are using a Unix-like machine such as Mac OS X or Linux).

For this tutorial we’re going to work with only the first 100 lines of the zone file because it makes it easy to show you what’s going on step by step. These steps would also work on the entire zone file, though it would take significantly longer to execute each of the commands.

1. Navigate to the location of the zone file

For this tutorial we’re only going to work with the first 100 lines of the zone file because it’s easier to show you what’s going on with each command we run. If you’d like to follow along, you can download the truncated zone file here.

After you’re in the folder with the zone file (or zone file example) you should be able to run ls -l and see the zone file:

terminal. $ ls l // rw-r—r 1 matt staff 4973 Oct 4 12:06 com.zone.example.txt

You can confirm the number of lines in the zone file by running wc -l:

terminal. $ wc -l com.zone.example.txt // 100 com.zone.example.txt

You can view the contents of the example zone file by opening it up in a text editor (again, don’t try this on the full zone file) or by running cat:

terminal. $ cat com.zone.example.txt

Here’s what the contents of the example zone file look like:

textfile. ; The use of the Data contained in Verisign Inc.‘s aggregated//; .com, and .net top-level domain zone files (including the checksum//; files) is subject to the restrictions described in the access Agreement//; with Verisign Inc.////$ORIGIN COM.//$TTL 900//@ IN SOA a.gtld-servers.net. nstld.verisign-grs.com. (// 1349069930 ;serial// 1800 ;refresh every 30 min// 900 ;retry every 15 min// 604800 ;expire after a week// 86400 ;minimum of 15 min// )//$TTL 172800// NS A.GTLD-SERVERS.NET.// NS G.GTLD-SERVERS.NET.// NS H.GTLD-SERVERS.NET.// NS C.GTLD-SERVERS.NET.// NS I.GTLD-SERVERS.NET.// NS B.GTLD-SERVERS.NET.// NS D.GTLD-SERVERS.NET.// NS L.GTLD-SERVERS.NET.// NS F.GTLD-SERVERS.NET.// NS J.GTLD-SERVERS.NET.// NS K.GTLD-SERVERS.NET.// NS E.GTLD-SERVERS.NET.// NS M.GTLD-SERVERS.NET.//COM. 86400 DNSKEY 256 3 8 AQOl6m3T1q7fQhwJYFfWJO/IvVmtfI2Eg2wX4UR9jcl/qaTiMp+7Kx7baGOsPvZwX4lVGYWif955l4lLh/VnnNJvjDxBWVQcDrH3cHzFAaq9QXZPcEk7UyTOBL1piVpB2dqJzbO2bH9XGFiOXPUj3nhQ7mxvW0bgRiKv9Qah/7NH2w//COM. 86400 DNSKEY 257 3 8 AQPDzldNmMvZFX4NcNJ0uEnKDg7tmv/F3MyQR0lpBmVcNcsIszxNFxsBfKNW9JYCYqpik8366LE7VbIcNRzfp2h9OO8HRl+H+E08zauK8k7evWEmu/6od+2boggPoiEfGNyvNPaSI7FOIroDsnw/taggzHRX1Z7SOiOiPWPNIwSUyWOZ79VmcQ1GLkC6NlYvG3HwYmynQv6oFwGv/KELSw7ZSdrbTQ0HXvZbqMUI7BaMskmvgm1G7oKZ1YiF7O9ioVNc0+7ASbqmZN7Z98EGU/Qh2K/BgUe8Hs0XVcdPKrtyYnoQHd2ynKPcMMlTEih2/2HDHjRPJ2aywIpKNnv4oPo///COM. 86400 NSEC3PARAM 1 0 0 -//COM. 86400 RRSIG NSEC3PARAM 8 1 86400 20121006041758 20120929030758 47783 COM. chypT55+F8iGvkLS2TVSiqonms7mRNjDe2g560bqSulngD7z4y+4qsz13ZOGY4yrM9lBOfGYtNxpai3Q9TAT9n0X2L/3cJDY/xyA5LFSC0ilRvm+zr41d5TRwuf/GMdj7pfN2w6IoSxYckgPczqWHG2yOpX6EPXuIPW5E2L8GZU=//COM. RRSIG NS 8 1 172800 20121006041758 20120929030758 47783 COM. hfdySh/hHeA0zNLcbLQMNtRsXcOVKzH7vGED0t8IbkdaOTeuSFi0E8vXMVUJDjK9hlVYsCa4bE5wh5X61pIKkI9SjyCDjUK92ZpG/2+rtHeYWRbREAMpgcZ4FAySSknskHOnkUa4c/0tA9ZOJ0AkNzxztUr+KinlC+Co8rp5aGg=//COM. 900 RRSIG SOA 8 1 900 20121008053850 20121001042850 47783 COM. odeDdoJS/JVKOMNcdDd4Oh8MnY2DoKobagNU44AKjYE9GuQ3sBgbXmyH3JOrS6a7iBmFexN6UAdLSNcCozOO0Ta51WQFcuJhbvZwhXNrjOH50pkcG7Xw9pzwlOrftj9R7pHwCDEagZp20GGtbGATf946D6CCUJSBmtZ8pqoEu7s=//COM. 86400 RRSIG DNSKEY 8 1 86400 20121005182533 20120928182033 30909 COM. nPBzPp1A3EBgwjf3IrrYVgVh0YcVqdd6YKQ4CeraP5vK8nIyUMqGMnLc2ykA/BWb8AtAdg6KiOVsXl+4dkkqijccbt8mEzUZ6aD3Gd1IT13K5uDq4tjhxaQTRkloZU1TC4FfRhe5DHQSHzTmOWn9ClqonMa2FeNaf9rlsaNCaWq4fctndbPhuhuN0m9EKSh0So8WhM/5wZqjsie9+S2yBPsxakXWTA3zwxR7y9sqfabfmH+KmrQRF2lCXxhF//of4zp3VLpG9UK1kS/4mQTdm8kNRzfgNgCKo1ejS4uMj5g0rS6n5aZvk8PfeVbBlhnVb3oDRImz/RIhZJ1×0w3kzA//ENERCONTECHNOLOGIES NS NS1.BIZ.RR//ENERCONTECHNOLOGIES NS NS2.BIZ.RR//SELFDRIVECARRENTAL NS NS9.IZP//SELFDRIVECARRENTAL NS IZA.HOSTING.DIGIWEB.IE.//SELFDRIVECARRENTAL NS NS8.FOR-SALE-IF-THEPRICE-IS-RIGHT//NANCYVRAINE NS NS1.IMCONLINE.NET.//NANCYVRAINE NS NS2.IMCONLINE.NET.//SELFDRIVECARRENTAL NS NS9.IZP//SELFDRIVECARRENTAL NS IZA.HOSTING.DIGIWEB.IE.//SELFDRIVECARRENTAL NS NS8.FOR-SALE-IF-THEPRICE-IS-RIGHT//WORLDDATASOURCE NS NS01.DOMAINCONTROL//WORLDDATASOURCE NS NS02.DOMAINCONTROL//SAUDIPHOTOGRAPHERS NS NS1.R4L//SAUDIPHOTOGRAPHERS NS NS2.R4L//MERCKCHOICE NS CBRU.BR.NS.ELS-GMS.ATT.NET.//MERCKCHOICE NS CMTU.MT.NS.ELS-GMS.ATT.NET.//ENVIRONMENTALSCHOOLS NS PSNS01.PAULSMITHS.EDU.//ENVIRONMENTALSCHOOLS NS PSNS02.PAULSMITHS.EDU.//EASTHAMPTONHOMES NS BUY.INTERNETTRAFFIC//EASTHAMPTONHOMES NS SELL.INTERNETTRAFFIC//AMERICASHOMEBUILDER NS BUY.INTERNETTRAFFIC//AMERICASHOMEBUILDER NS SELL.INTERNETTRAFFIC//BOVINUS NS C3P0.CBFENTERPRISES//BOVINUS NS R2D2.CBFENTERPRISES//CONSTELLATIONCOLLEGE NS NS1.SEDOPARKING//CONSTELLATIONCOLLEGE NS NS2.SEDOPARKING//DOCHERTYCONSULTING NS NS1.VERINOTE.NET.//DOCHERTYCONSULTING NS NS3.VERINOTE.NET.//SONOMETRICS NS NS35.WORLDNIC//SONOMETRICS NS NS36.WORLDNIC//UNLIMITEDDISCOUNTPHONECALLS NS DNS1.NAME-SERVICES//UNLIMITEDDISCOUNTPHONECALLS NS DNS2.NAME-SERVICES//UNLIMITEDDISCOUNTPHONECALLS NS DNS3.NAME-SERVICES//UNLIMITEDDISCOUNTPHONECALLS NS DNS4.NAME-SERVICES//UNLIMITEDDISCOUNTPHONECALLS NS DNS5.NAME-SERVICES//FREILAND NS NS1.FABULOUS//FREILAND NS NS2.FABULOUS//KUMANET NS UNS01.LOLIPOP.JP.//KUMANET NS UNS02.LOLIPOP.JP.//SANGYOSHIEN NS NS55.WORLDNIC//SANGYOSHIEN NS NS56.WORLDNIC//JONATHANCHARLESNOVAK NS DNS077.A.REGISTER//JONATHANCHARLESNOVAK NS DNS030.B.REGISTER//JONATHANCHARLESNOVAK NS DNS030.C.REGISTER//JONATHANCHARLESNOVAK NS DNS010.D.REGISTER//HQSINGAPORE NS NS41.DOMAINCONTROL//HQSINGAPORE NS NS42.DOMAINCONTROL//PANASOURCE NS F1G1NS1.DNSPOD.NET.//PANASOURCE NS F1G1NS2.DNSPOD.NET.//PRIVATESAUNAS NS NS.BUYDOMAINS//PRIVATESAUNAS NS THISDOMAINFORSALE//BARBARASTREISAND NS NS1.LAMEDELEGATION.NET.//BARBARASTREISAND NS NS2.LAMEDELEGATION.NET.//MONICAMAGNETTI NS NS21.DOMAINCONTROL//MONICAMAGNETTI NS NS22.DOMAINCONTROL//IGUANAWORLD NS DNS1.TNIB.DE.//IGUANAWORLD NS DNS2.TNIB.DE.//IGUANAWORLD NS DNS3.TNIB.DE.//PERFECTDAYSTUDIOS NS NS2.DYNADOT//PERFECTDAYSTUDIOS NS NS1.DYNADOT//SVCROSS NS NS1.ZONEEDIT//SVCROSS NS NS5.ZONEEDIT//EBEIJING NS NS1.PEER1.NET.//EBEIJING NS NS2.PEER1.NET.//NASHSATTERFIELD NS HOME.GIS.NET.

For the purposes of this tutorial you can ignore the first 35 lines or so. The first domain name the file contains is EnerconTechnologies:

textfile. ENERCONTECHNOLOGIES NS NS1.BIZ.RR // ENERCONTECHNOLOGIES NS NS2.BIZ.RR // SELFDRIVECARRENTAL NS NS9.IZP // SELFDRIVECARRENTAL NS IZA.HOSTING.DIGIWEB.IE. // SELFDRIVECARRENTAL NS NS8.FOR-SALE-IF-THEPRICE-IS-RIGHT // …

Notice that there’s one entry for each name server associated with the domain name.

You can confirm the name server’s are correct by running whois on a domain name and checking whether the name servers are are identical:

terminal. $ whois ENERCONTECHNOLOGIES.COM////Whois Server Version 2.0////Domain names in the .com and .net domains can now be registered//with many different competing registrars. Go to http://www.internic.net for detailed information.//// Domain Name: ENERCONTECHNOLOGIES.COM// Registrar: NETWORK SOLUTIONS, LLC.// Whois Server: whois.networksolutions.com// Referral URL: http://www.networksolutions.com/en_US//Name Server: NS1.BIZ.RR.COM// Name Server: NS2.BIZ.RR.COM// Status: clientTransferProhibited// Updated Date: 03-mar-2012// Creation Date: 03-mar-1999// Expiration Date: 03-mar-2022

Extracting just the domain names

In order to extract just the domain names we’ve got to run a series of commands so that all that’s left when we’re done is a list of the domain names. We’ll do this step by step, though you could easily pipe (|) these commands together to achieve the same result.

Notice that the line with domain name and name server is formatted consistently: it’s the domain name, then a space, then the name server. If we want to extract just the domain names, then we can run a command that will extract everything before the first space. To do this, we use the awk command and send the output to first.com.zone.example.txt:

terminal. $ awk ‘{print $1}’ com.zone.example.txt > first.com.zone.example.txt

If you examine the resulting first.com.zone.example.txt you’ll notice a much cleaner output:

textfile. ;//;//;//;////$ORIGIN//$TTL//@//1349069930//1800//900//604800//86400//)//$TTL//NS//NS//NS//NS//NS//NS//NS//NS//NS//NS//NS//NS//NS//COM.//COM.//COM.//COM.//COM.//COM.//COM.//ENERCONTECHNOLOGIES//ENERCONTECHNOLOGIES//SELFDRIVECARRENTAL//SELFDRIVECARRENTAL//SELFDRIVECARRENTAL//NANCYVRAINE//NANCYVRAINE//SELFDRIVECARRENTAL//SELFDRIVECARRENTAL//SELFDRIVECARRENTAL//WORLDDATASOURCE//WORLDDATASOURCE//SAUDIPHOTOGRAPHERS//SAUDIPHOTOGRAPHERS//MERCKCHOICE//MERCKCHOICE//ENVIRONMENTALSCHOOLS//ENVIRONMENTALSCHOOLS//EASTHAMPTONHOMES//EASTHAMPTONHOMES//AMERICASHOMEBUILDER//AMERICASHOMEBUILDER//BOVINUS//BOVINUS//CONSTELLATIONCOLLEGE//CONSTELLATIONCOLLEGE//DOCHERTYCONSULTING//DOCHERTYCONSULTING//SONOMETRICS//SONOMETRICS//UNLIMITEDDISCOUNTPHONECALLS//UNLIMITEDDISCOUNTPHONECALLS//UNLIMITEDDISCOUNTPHONECALLS//UNLIMITEDDISCOUNTPHONECALLS//UNLIMITEDDISCOUNTPHONECALLS//FREILAND//FREILAND//KUMANET//KUMANET//SANGYOSHIEN//SANGYOSHIEN//JONATHANCHARLESNOVAK//JONATHANCHARLESNOVAK//JONATHANCHARLESNOVAK//JONATHANCHARLESNOVAK//HQSINGAPORE//HQSINGAPORE//PANASOURCE//PANASOURCE//PRIVATESAUNAS//PRIVATESAUNAS//BARBARASTREISAND//BARBARASTREISAND//MONICAMAGNETTI//MONICAMAGNETTI//IGUANAWORLD//IGUANAWORLD//IGUANAWORLD//PERFECTDAYSTUDIOS//PERFECTDAYSTUDIOS//SVCROSS//SVCROSS//EBEIJING//EBEIJING//NASHSATTERFIELD

Not bad, but there’s a lot of duplicates because domain names are listed once for each name server, so let’s clean the file up a bit by removing duplicates and sorting the results alphabetically:

terminal. $ sort -u first.com.zone.example.txt > sorted_and_unique.com.zone.example.txt

Here we use the sort command with the u switch to sort the file and remove the duplicates.

The new sorted_and_unique.com.zone.example.txt is looking pretty good:

textfile. //$ORIGIN//$TTL//)//1349069930//1800//604800//86400//900//;//@//AMERICASHOMEBUILDER//BARBARASTREISAND//BOVINUS//COM.//CONSTELLATIONCOLLEGE//DOCHERTYCONSULTING//EASTHAMPTONHOMES//EBEIJING//ENERCONTECHNOLOGIES//ENVIRONMENTALSCHOOLS//FREILAND//HQSINGAPORE//IGUANAWORLD//JONATHANCHARLESNOVAK//KUMANET//MERCKCHOICE//MONICAMAGNETTI//NANCYVRAINE//NASHSATTERFIELD//NS//PANASOURCE//PERFECTDAYSTUDIOS//PRIVATESAUNAS//SANGYOSHIEN//SAUDIPHOTOGRAPHERS//SELFDRIVECARRENTAL//SELFDRIVECARRENTAL//SONOMETRICS//SVCROSS//UNLIMITEDDISCOUNTPHONECALLS//WORLDDATASOURCE

The last problem is that there are a number of lines left over that can’t possibly be domain names because they contain invalid characters such as $ORIGIN and COM.. We’ll use egrep (or grep -e) to extract only the lines that are valid domain names:

terminal. $ egrep ‘^[A-Z0-9]([A-Z0-9-]{0,61}[A-Z0-9])?$’ //sorted_and_unique.com.zone.example.txt > domains.com.zone.example.txt

In case you’re curious, that regular expression finds strings that:

  1. Start and end with a letter of a number (we can just look at uppercase letters because that’s how all the domain names in the zone file are formatted)
  2. Contain letters, numbers, or dashes in between
  3. Are 1 to 63 characters in length

At last, we have a file we can work with:

textfile. 1349069930//1800//604800//86400//900//AMERICASHOMEBUILDER//BARBARASTREISAND//BOVINUS//CONSTELLATIONCOLLEGE//DOCHERTYCONSULTING//EASTHAMPTONHOMES//EBEIJING//ENERCONTECHNOLOGIES//ENVIRONMENTALSCHOOLS//FREILAND//HQSINGAPORE//IGUANAWORLD//JONATHANCHARLESNOVAK//KUMANET//MERCKCHOICE//MONICAMAGNETTI//NANCYVRAINE//NASHSATTERFIELD//NS//PANASOURCE//PERFECTDAYSTUDIOS//PRIVATESAUNAS//SANGYOSHIEN//SAUDIPHOTOGRAPHERS//SELFDRIVECARRENTAL//SELFDRIVECARRENTAL//SONOMETRICS//SVCROSS//UNLIMITEDDISCOUNTPHONECALLS//WORLDDATASOURCE

The one thing that’s inaccurate about this list are the numbers which are not actually domain names though they are listed as such at the top of the list. You could remove these, though the resulting list is more than accurate enough to analyze and use at this point (and all of those numbers do have corresponding .coms except for 1349069930 anyway).

Hope you found this tutorial useful. If you have any questions or notice anything that can be done more efficiently please drop me a note matt@leandomainsearch.com.

Thanks!